Wednesday, March 02, 2005

Springy floorboards

What a strange noise. There is a guy crawling around under our house chocking up the piers where the ground has settled a bit. Well it is a 110 year old house built on a clay surface. We had gaps between the floorboards and the piers resulting in springy boards in certain sections of the house. The dog is going nuts trying to defend the house against the subterranean intruder.

Yesterday I blog swopped with a co-student. Possibly a bit premature. I'm still getting a hang of this thing. Not sure what I am doing with it yet. But sort of thrilling that it now features as one of the blogs of other PHD students around the place in his list of blogs. Thanks. Did I qualify that this is a really boring blog that contains the most banale asides of my life and very few insights?

Well as long as you know that...

I've been doing some productive work recently interspersed with periods of getting to know some other students, wrangling tradespeople and being a new Aunt. Current readings include a bunch of interesting journal articles including an organisational management type article on personal decoration of the work space, an ethnographic study of the making of Automatic Speech Recognition technologies and a cultural studies/sociological investigation into the affective dimensions of car driving.

Also have a new old game to explore and have been working on my summaries of readings to date. Talking to another student I am wondering whether I am approaching this a bit too formally. Each summary is taking forever and I think I'm treating it as if it was a review.

7 comments:

Glen Fuller said...

premature! I have a thing for temporality. I think one day I shall have to write book called Popular Temporalities. Favourite line at the moment:

GANDALF: A wizard is never late...nor early...he arrives precisely when he means to!

Indeed! Tis true for all the wizards I know.

Surely you have seen the random stuff on my blog. It will be good to have someone with a sensible blog at the CCR so not everyone thinks we are silly. Don't you reckon?

Ms M said...

Very nice of you Glen. And if I was Gandalf you know, I would feel pretty OK about turning up any time...

Please no - how can I avoid getting the sensible tag. I will have to get some more pictures or something...

Glen Fuller said...

Oh, no, you can't be sensible. That is impossible, because we have the same glasses.

No, I was very serious, perhaps rephrasing, a more sensible blog than mine is a good thing for the CCR! I think I may go overboard sometimes.

Ms M said...

Overboard? Nah. I think it's great. Have you ever been to NZ Glen? I was blown away when in the south island of NZ recently to see how common it is for people to never get rid of their cars. You'd be driving down the highway and you'd see backyard after backyard chocker with cars, multi-generations of cars, mountains of cars. I know you see it sometimes in Australia but NZ seems to have made landscape art of cars and bits of cars. The other technique I observed is using lots of old tyres to hold down plastic sheeting which covered what I think was hay. I never really worked out what was underneath.

Glen Fuller said...

NZ, indeed! I was there in 2003 for the CSAA conference. Didn't stay long. NZ lacks a local manufacturing capacity and has different laws regarding the importation of cars so the mix of cars in general is very different. heaps more japanese imports. cultural history via unintended car-scapes, you reckon?

Ben Kraal said...

Ethnography on Automatic Speech Recognition? Tell me more!

Ms M said...

Hi Ben,

Oh I just saw this post. The journal paper is a really interesting one because it captures the disputed terrains in research on a number of levels - the difficulty of language to express the meaning of the event as it is in process, the different understandings of hearing and speech, the different perspectives of professionals coming from their individual disciplines. I admit my favourite bit is when they call in the local network/computer dood to fix something in order for the experiment to proceed. It taps into an interest I have in this sort of bodily and worldly sense of a system that seems to derive from practice and a level of intimacy of the system. People who work with technology day in day out often have this 'worldly and bodily sense'. To many it looks like magic, because at some level it is intuitive and based on qualities of feeling and touch. It operates in what many would consider a traditionally feminine paradigm.

The details are:

Humans, Machines, and Conversations: An Ethnographic Study of the Making of Automatic Speech Recognition Technologies by Adelheid Voskuhl in Social Studies of Science 34/3(June 2004) 365–393 © SSS and SAGE Publications (London, Thousand Oaks CA, New Delhi) ISSN 0306-3127 DOI: 10.1177/0306312704042576 www.sagepublications.com